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Species: mouse
Number of cells: 2881
Study size: 147MB

Characterization 
brain 

Molecular interrogation of hypothalamic organization reveals distinct dopamine neuronal subtypes

Roman A Romanov, Amit Zeisel, Joanne Bakker, Fatima Girach, Arash Hellysaz, Raju Tomer, Alán Alpár, Jan Mulder, Frédéric Clotman, Erik Keimpema, Brian Hsueh, Ailey K Crow, Henrik Martens, Christian Schwindling, Daniela Calvigioni, Jaideep S Bains, Zoltán Máté, Gábor Szabó, Yuchio Yanagawa, Ming-Dong Zhang, Andre Rendeiro, Matthias Farlik, Mathias Uhlén, Peer Wulff, Christoph Bock, Christian Broberger, Karl Deisseroth, Tomas Hökfelt, Sten Linnarsson, Tamas L Horvath, Tibor Harkany

The hypothalamus contains the highest diversity of neurons in the brain. Many of these neurons can co-release neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in a use-dependent manner. Investigators have hitherto relied on candidate protein-based tools to correlate behavioral, endocrine and gender traits with hypothalamic neuron identity. Here we map neuronal identities in the hypothalamus by single-cell RNA sequencing. We distinguished 62 neuronal subtypes producing glutamatergic, dopaminergic or GABAergic markers for synaptic neurotransmission and harboring the ability to engage in task-dependent neurotransmitter switching. We identified dopamine neurons that uniquely coexpress the Onecut3 and Nmur2 genes, and placed these in the periventricular nucleus with many synaptic afferents arising from neuromedin S+ neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. These neuroendocrine dopamine cells may contribute to the dopaminergic inhibition of prolactin secretion diurnally, as their neuromedin S+ inputs originate from neurons expressing Per2 and Per3 and their tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation is regulated in a circadian fashion. Overall, our catalog of neuronal subclasses provides new understanding of hypothalamic organization and function.

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